Sunsets and Tarpon

September 25, 2017

 There are few things I enjoy more than guiding clients to fish; however, I do enjoy my time with my wife a little more.  We've been married for a little over 24 years now and there is no one I like spending time on the water with more than her.  This time of year is our favorite.  Sure there are hurricanes and mosquitoes, but there are also beautiful sunsets and one of our favorite targets: baby tarpon.  

 

Baby tarpon fishing takes place is some of the most magical places in our area.  These areas are often marsh areas where the saltwater mingles with freshwater, creating estuaries full of life.  These transitional areas are so important to our way of life and those of the fish we chase.  They provide a protected nursery habitat where small predators can feed while avoiding larger predators.  The amount of life supported by these areas is something you have to see first hand in order to understand it.  Various baitfish, shrimp, crabs, birds, hogs, deer, rabbits, manatee, and a host of other life gather in these areas to complete the "circle of life".  They are areas that Kim and I love to spend time and enjoy everything that nature has to offer.

 

Our typical evening starts just a few hours before sunset.  We take a quick trip to the location we desire either by truck or boat.  No matter the method of arrival, there is ample time to relax, take your time, and start soaking in the atmosphere.  This is a time we shut the ac off, if we are in the truck, roll down the windows, and take in everything.  The odor of the marsh as the breeze pushes it in the window, the sound of cicadas in the trees, the call of an osprey, or maybe that of a great blue heron as he takes flight from your approach.  This is the time you become immersed in nature and just forget about the headaches of the world behind.  When we pull up to the location we have decided on, you grab a cold beverage, take a seat, and watch the water's surface.  What are we looking for?  Most of the time we are looking for the telltale roll of tarpon; that moment when a tarpon rolls to the surface to gulp air, flashes its silver sides in the sun, and gently splashes water.  Sometimes it is a little more dramatic as a tarpon crashes bait or decides to show of its aerial capability by free jumping through the air.  We watch for a few moments, enjoying the show and determining where they are concentrating their efforts; a little patience and practice in observation leads to a lot more success.  Besides, the day is ending and there is no reason to rush.

 

Next, we select our spots and grab our gear.  It's time to stop watching the show and become a part of it.  My favorite part is sitting back and watching the smile it brings upon Kim's face.  These small tarpon are an absolute blast.  What they lack in size, they more than make up for with aggression and tenacity.  Besides, using light tackle also insures that you will enjoy the fight too.  The added bonus comes when you are expecting a fish in the 2-5 pound range and wind up with a 20-30 pound tarpon or a big snook decides they've had enough watching others have the fun.  The fishing is fast and fun, not requiring the long casts of larger tarpon or the back breaking fight of them.  Nope, this is all about fun and enjoying the little things.

 As you can see in this video, these small tarpon bring a lot of laughs and smiles.  They fight until the very end and are a perfect target for those who like casting smaller fly rods or just want something different with their ultralight spinning gear.  Yep, nothing makes me happier than listening to this laughter and looking at the smile or her face.  Of course, I'd also be happy to share this experience with you too.  It's a great way to enjoy a different side of Florida, catch a tarpon, watch a spectacular sunset, and melt your worries away.  Call now and let's book your trip!

 

Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Please reload